I do indeed have a form of cerebral palsy that affects the entire left side of my body and also compromises movement on the right side.
When I travel, I take my own chair with me. I guess the difficulty is that I can’t wheel my own chair, so I always need to have someone there to wheel me about. Travelling itself is alright, because I have lovely parents who drive me to the airport and assistance on the airport/plane so far have been pretty good for me.
Public transit here is hard, but I’ve found that whenever I’ve traveled, it’s been better in other countries, especially in the big cities. Once again, though, I can’t really get anywhere by myself.
So, other than being really reliant, traveling has been fairly easy for me. I love it. It also helps that I’m not afraid to open my mouth and stick my neck out to get the help I need.

I do indeed have a form of cerebral palsy that affects the entire left side of my body and also compromises movement on the right side.

When I travel, I take my own chair with me. I guess the difficulty is that I can’t wheel my own chair, so I always need to have someone there to wheel me about. Travelling itself is alright, because I have lovely parents who drive me to the airport and assistance on the airport/plane so far have been pretty good for me.

Public transit here is hard, but I’ve found that whenever I’ve traveled, it’s been better in other countries, especially in the big cities. Once again, though, I can’t really get anywhere by myself.

So, other than being really reliant, traveling has been fairly easy for me. I love it. It also helps that I’m not afraid to open my mouth and stick my neck out to get the help I need.


Does anyone remember Pimp My Ride?

Well, when I was in my first year of university, some of my classmates decided I needed to ‘Pimp My Wheelchair’. So they got me reflective plates and neon beads to put in my wheels. They made the most annoying rattling noise. I also got an old-fashioned horn so I could scare the shit out of anyone who was in my way. I don’t know what make me think of this and why I’m sharing, but it made me smile.


I’m often remembered, recognised or referred to as ‘that girl in the wheelchair’, but I don’t mind. I’d rather be recognised and remembered like that, than not at all.


A Vantage Point of Asses, chapter 1

This is not necessarily the final version of the first chapter but It should give you an indication of my writing:

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Since I’m having an honest -share personal things with you- day, let me tell you about my disability.

Some of you know this, others don’t: I’m physically disabled.

I was born on September 30th, 1987, a full 12 weeks before I was supposed to be born. Premature birth was more common in the 80s for children born out of IVF.

My lungs were barely fully developed as I was still very small so I was ventilated. At some point on my first day, my lung collapsed and the pressure on my brain increased, causing me to have a hemorrhage, which did some serious damage.

I have, since that day, had cerebral palsy. For me, this means a left sided spasm (the entire left side of my body is affected) and even some traces of it in the right side of my body (like fine motor-function). Most people, when they think of spasm, think of involuntary flailing of limbs. This is not the case for me, but there is constant tension in my body and I can’t control the movements I make as precisely as I want.

So I walk funny. As a child there was never much of a problem with energy, but by the time I was sixteen, I needed a wheelchair for long distance trips. Now, when I walk, it’s with a walker. Getting older - and lack of exercise of those muscles that I can’t use - has made things a lot worse. I can’t walk without my orthopedic shoes without holding on to something anymore. My energy is drained MUCH faster than it used to be.

Still, I live in my own house, by myself. I have a part-time job (that I’ve had for three years) and a creative outlet. I’m not always happy, but I try to be.